xaml

Using Flex with Ruby on Rails

Posted on March 26, 2008. Filed under: adobe, flex, mxml, rails, ruby, ruby on rails, silverlight, xaml |

This is the second blog post in a series of three posts comparing Flex with Silverlight. In my previous post I demonstrated how to integrate a scaffolded Rails application with Silverlight. Here I will be showing the same with Flex. The steps needed to create the Rails application are also mentioned here.

 

Creating a new Flex project:

Open Flex builder and create a new Flex project.

image

Leave all the options to default and click Finish. A blank project is now created for you.

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Using Silverlight with Ruby on Rails

Posted on March 26, 2008. Filed under: adobe, C#, crud, flex, microsoft, mxml, rails, ruby, ruby on rails, silverlight, xaml |

In this post I will be showing a really simple example of creating a Silverlight frontend for a Rails backend. This is what I think will be a three part series comparing Silverlight with Flex.

The steps will be:

  1. Creating a Rails application.
  2. Creating a frontend for it in silverlight.
  3. Creating a frontend for it in Flex.
  4. Comparing the approaches taken in both the frontends.

I will try to keep changes in the backend Rails application to a minimum.

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Silverlight 2.0 Beta-1 now available, version 1.0 ported to Nokia mobiles

Posted on March 5, 2008. Filed under: expression blend, microsoft, nokia, silverlight, user interface, xaml |

Microsoft has just released highly anticipated first beta of Silverlight here. The development tools for visual  studio 2008 can be downloaded from here. Tutorials are also available on the same site.

This link reports that Silverlight is now also available on the Nokia mobile devices (specifically S60 on Symbian OS, as well as for Series 40 devices and Nokia Internet tablets). It seems really strange that silverlight wasn’t ported to window mobile devices first. There is a version available for window mobiles as well. I hope it is better than flash lite which really sucks.

If the performance of Silverlight is anywhere near flash then it could be a huge success for Microsoft as .Net as a development platform is already very popular and developers can use their existing skills to create better web experiences. Also IronPython and IronRuby (two of the Silverlight programming languages) are much better (and faster?) languages than Actionscript and .Net provides a much bigger library set.

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Creating a User Interface in Ruby using WPF

Posted on October 9, 2007. Filed under: ruby, user interface, windows, wpf, xaml | Tags: , , , , , , |

Let me first explain what is WPF?

WPF is the graphical subsystem if the .NET 3.0 framework and it is there to take the place of window forms which we used with earlier versions of .NET

So what’s so great about WPF?

Actually WPF is has its roots in DirectX API so you can easily create 2D and 3D interfaces in it without putting ant load on the processor. Also it is vector based and stores the information for the generating the UI in separate XAML files. So we have logical separation of a control from its appearance.

Further details: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_Presentation_Foundation

The following are the requirements for running this example:

  • rubyclr gem. Use gem install rubyclr -y
  • .NET framework 3.0

In this example I will creating a creating a textarea along with a button, trapping the events on the button and logging it inside the textarea .

Here is the code for the xaml file. Store this file with filename ui.xaml. This file contains the UI for the application.

   1: <Window
   2: xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
   3: xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml">
   4: <Grid x:Name="LayoutRoot">
   5: <Button Margin="8,0,8,5.723" VerticalAlignment="Bottom" Content="Button" Name="the_button"/>
   6: <TextBox Margin="8,8,8,38" Name="the_text_box"/>
   7: </Grid>
   8: </Window>
 

Next I will be creating the codebehind file in ruby. Here in this file we have all the application logic. Save this file as logic.rb.

   1: # load the libraries
   2: require 'rubygems'
   3: require 'wpf'
   4: # load the xaml file
   5: window = XamlReader.Load(System::IO::File.open_read('ui.xaml'))
   6:  
   7: # get the controls
   8: button = window.find_name('the_button')
   9: txt_box = window.find_name('the_text_box')
  10: # trap the mouse enter event
  11: button.mouse_enter do |sender, args|
  12: txt_box.text += "MOUSE ENTERED\n"
  13: end
  14: # trap the mouse leave event
  15: button.mouse_leave do |sender, args|
  16: txt_box.text += "MOUSE LEFT\n"
  17: end
  18: # trap the mouse click event
  19: button.click do |sender, args|
  20: txt_box.text += "MOUSE CLICKED\n"
  21: end
  22: # run the application (most important)
  23: Application.new.run(window)

The code given above explains itself.

We are first loading the ui.xaml file and then finding the two controls in the lines 8, 9.

Then the three event handlers are declared in lines 11, 14, 19. So whenever the mouse events are fired the corresponding event if traced into the textbox.

And here is the output.

image

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